Animals of the Pana'ewa Rainforest Zoo and Gardens

An Animal Gallery – hope to see you soon at the zoo.

Nene

Native Hawaiian Nene Geese are the State Bird of Hawaii. Almost extinct by the 1940’s, protection and restoration efforts have increased their number. They are believed to have evolved from a common ancestral type, related to the Canada Goose, and do resemble them somewhat.

White Bengal Tiger

Tzatiki, our White Bengal Tiger, is a male. White Bengal Tigers are rare. There are about 130 in captivity in zoos and in Las Vegas. They are white with chocolate stripes due to a mutation in a recessive gene which also causes them to have crossed eyes of grey-blue color.

Hyacinth Macaw

The Hyacinth Macaw is the largest of all parrots at 3.3 ft and the largest of the flying parrots. They come from Central and Eastern South America. Their lifespan is estimated at 50 years. Their survival status is Endangered. Rowdy arrived at our zoo in September 2013. These are very entertaining birds to watch. They like to dance.

Giant Anteater

Giant Anteaters live in Central and South America from southern Belize to northern Argentina in savanna, grasslands, montane and open tropical rainforests. They like to sniff out their prey of termites and ants, worms, larvae and some fruit. An anteater can dip the tongue into an anthill or termite mound up to 150 times a minute and may eat as many as 30,000 ants or termites in a single day! They don’t walk on their feet; instead, with the claws curled up into the feet, anteaters walk on their “fists”. This helps to keep the claws sharp so they can dig, or defend themselves.

Ring-Tailed Lemur

The Ring-Tailed Lemur, found in south and southwestern portions of Madagascar, live from sea level up to 8,530 feet in a variety of habitat types including rainforests, sub-alpine, gallery, deciduous and spiny bush forests. Here at the zoo, Casper, our friendly ‘ghost’, (lemur means ghost in the native language), eats chopped fruit and lettuce, and leaf-eater biscuits. Ring-Tailed Lemurs like to start the day sun-bathing before foraging for food. They like to walk about on all fours through the forests, but will stand and run in a sideways skipping motion to escape danger. They make a variety of sounds: clicks, grunts, cat-like purrs, squeals, and howls.

Indian Blue Peafowl

Our Indian Blue Peafowl (males are called peacocks; females are called peahens) have the run of the zoo and often surprise visitors when they are seen flying or perching in trees or on the rooftops of exhibits. The male, or peacock, is known for its beautiful plumage on display during mating season. The peahen is less colorful.

Nene

Native Hawaiian Nene Geese are the State Bird of Hawaii. Almost extinct by the 1940’s, protection and restoration efforts have increased their number. They are believed to have evolved from a common ancestral type, related to the Canada Goose, and do resemble them somewhat.

White Bengal Tiger

Tzatiki, our White Bengal Tiger, is a male. White Bengal Tigers are rare. There are about 130 in captivity in zoos and in Las Vegas. They are white with chocolate stripes due to a mutation in a recessive gene which also causes them to have crossed eyes of grey-blue color.

Hyacinth Macaw

The Hyacinth Macaw is the largest of all parrots at 3.3 ft and the largest of the flying parrots. They come from Central and Eastern South America. Their lifespan is estimated at 50 years. Their survival status is Endangered. Rowdy arrived at our zoo in September 2013. These are very entertaining birds to watch. They like to dance.

Giant Anteater

Giant Anteaters live in Central and South America from southern Belize to northern Argentina in savanna, grasslands, montane and open tropical rainforests. They like to sniff out their prey of termites and ants, worms, larvae and some fruit. An anteater can dip the tongue into an anthill or termite mound up to 150 times a minute and may eat as many as 30,000 ants or termites in a single day! They don’t walk on their feet; instead, with the claws curled up into the feet, anteaters walk on their “fists”. This helps to keep the claws sharp so they can dig, or defend themselves.

Ring-Tailed Lemur

The Ring-Tailed Lemur, found in south and southwestern portions of Madagascar, live from sea level up to 8,530 feet in a variety of habitat types including rainforests, sub-alpine, gallery, deciduous and spiny bush forests. Here at the zoo, Casper, our friendly ‘ghost’, (lemur means ghost in the native language), eats chopped fruit and lettuce, and leaf-eater biscuits. Ring-Tailed Lemurs like to start the day sun-bathing before foraging for food. They like to walk about on all fours through the forests, but will stand and run in a sideways skipping motion to escape danger. They make a variety of sounds: clicks, grunts, cat-like purrs, squeals, and howls.

Indian Blue Peafowl

Our Indian Blue Peafowl (males are called peacocks; females are called peahens) have the run of the zoo and often surprise visitors when they are seen flying or perching in trees or on the rooftops of exhibits. The male, or peacock, is known for its beautiful plumage on display during mating season. The peahen is less colorful.

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